Need to be fluent in Mandarin to get a design job?

Discussion in 'General Design Talk' started by sketchforsketch, May 24, 2012.

  1. sketchforsketch Administrator

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    Came across a job lately it required the applicant to have both spoken and written Mandarin Chinese before applying. (and that with a masters degree) I am just wondering is this kind of thing going be the norm soon. In addition, should all colleges handing out design degrees be teaching Mandarin Chinese to allow the designers of origin to compete on a global level? What do you think?
  2. Gameface Moderator

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    interesting question. And one that is more relevant than maybe when we were in school. I know in my school everyone had to do french or german first year and then choose one. The problem was most people told ya the first day german was hard to learn so I never got into it...o maybe it was cos the german book was cold looking while the french was warmer...I kept french for the junior even though we were the first year allowed to drop both if we wanted..but i didn\'t keep it for the leaving. I always wished i\'d put an effort into the german, but was only when I came to work and was doing mold design I realy wished i\'d done german...not that we have much contact with companies there, in in fact we deal with english, italian, portuguise, spanish and chineese but there is always bottle spec\'s coming from germany (would be handy to understand what it says without haveing to use google translate) and a lot off the engineering off the machine\'s is german so the set up boks are from there.
    But the reality is if you have a language your at an advantage...at the minute chinesse is seen as the one to have seeing as so much is made out there...but as to if we should learn it at this stage...yes if possible but would be hard (think sheldon in the big bang). But def think one\'s in school should be made learn at least one european one, and maybe some chineese, but the colleges going forward for industrial design should have a language on the course. Maybe its best that you take a classes in your chosen subject or maybe one college concentrate on one main language and have the option to do a second one if the college has the leacturers? Say sligo does german, NCAD is mandrin, letternenny is Italian etc?

    As regards having it as a requirement in one way is unfair but if your going to be dealing directly with someone ot there you need a language off communication, so either you have chineese or they have english...which do you trust more? Or in our case we deal with a middle man so we never actually speak to anyone in china.
  3. sketchforsketch Administrator

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    Yes, I had a similar experience in second level, when learning French, unfortunately the French teacher was a bit of a nutter, more often times than not she ended up firing the glantoir (board duster) in the direction of an unruly student, but it often missed her target and hit someone else. Didn’t really learn anything in that class, mainly because the class was full of disruptive idiots and the teacher failed to control her environment.
    So yes became disillusioned and ended sketching through out the duration of this class (yes my own fault really, big regret now tho). Class calmed down two weeks prior to the exam. So ya man, scraped home with a pass. Eventually, it came to a toss up between technical drawing and French and I was out of there with my setsquares in hand.

    When I eventually got work, I had to translate a brochure into a French and Italian, but luckily enough, there was a translator at hand. Have to agree with you we should have learned a language in college.

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